International Association of Dental Students (IADS)

The International Association of Dental Students was formed in 1951, to unite the dental students of the world and allow them to exchange knowledge and experiences about dentistry at an international level.

Available cities/universities: Universidad Austral de Chile
Best period for exchange: March – December
Exchange duration: 2 -4 weeks
Language requirements: Spanish /English
Type of exchange: unilateral/bilateral
Clinical work possibilities: Work in progress..
Social program: YES
LEO: Nicolás Cohn Inostroza
Available cities/universities: Universidad El Bosque, 6 per year
Best period for exchange: All year
Exam periods: November-January/April-June
Exchange duration: 2 – 3 weeks
Language requirements: Spanish or English
Deadline for applications: 2 months in advance
Form of application required: – Motivation letter.
– IADS application form with photo
– Paper which accredit you as student of your school with, present the original when you arrived to school.
– Scan of your passport
Deadline for confirmation: Two weeks after application
Social Program: Colombian night and Tours around the city and close towns.
Estimated Cost: Whole program about 600 USD
Name of University and number of students accepted:
A) Charles university in Prague – faculty in Pilsen – 4 places
B) Masaryk university in Brno – 1-2 places
Period and duration of program:
A – July, 1-2 weeks
B – July/August, 1-2 weeks
Deadline of application: End of April 2015
Clinical work possibility: Only observing
Requirements: if the candidate is skill ful can practice under expert supervision
Language: English
Name of NEO: Jakub Folbr
Contact: neo.ssscr@gmail.com
Estimated Cost: Accomodation about 100 Czech Crowns per night, cinema 150 CZK, public transport 20 CZK per ride, bread 25 CZK, milk 25 CZK, disko 30 CZK with ISIC… (One Euro = 27 Czech Crowns)
Semmelweis University Faculity of Dentistry Budapest
Number accepted per year: 30
Period and duration of program:
2 periods of exchange, only these are available:
– 1, 06.07.-19.07.2015
– 2, 20.07-02.08.2015
Exchange duration: 2 weeks
Deadline of application: 1st of May for those countries which are in need of Inviation letter, others: 15th of May
Clinical work possibility: none, only observation
Language requirements: English or hungarian
Form of application required: IADS application form, signed by dean. Students who need Inviation letter passport scan
Name of NEO: Vilma Karolina Rado
Contact: mfhe.neo@gmail.com
Estimated Cost:
• accommodation: 110 euros/2weeks:
Insurance deposit system requirements: 50 euros has to be payed at arrival, which will be returned after the exchange period, if the room is clean, and no damage is done in the.
Name of University and number of students accepted:
Kolhan university, delhii university, bhopal university
Period and duration of program: 15 days to 1 month
Deadline: 1 Month prior to arrival to India
Clinical work possibility: Observations
Requirement: if the candidate is skill ful can practice under expert supervision
Language: English
Name of NEO: Dr Pradeep sharma NAVNIT KUMAR
Contact: navnitp29@gmail.com
Estimated Cost: 200 euros
Name of University and number of students accepted:
24 universities across Indonesia
Period and duration of program: June-September
Exchange Duration: 2-3 weeks
Deadline of application: 1 months in advance
Clinical work possibilities: 2-5 hours in clinic
Social program: city tour and tourism objects visits
Requirements: Personal and contact information for emergency, English or Turkish( if it is possible) language requirements
Name of NEO: Cynthia Sugianto
Contact: komisi-e@iads-web.org
Estimated cost of exchange:
• accommodation: 10€ /night for student hotel or free for dormitory
• public transport: 10-15 € /week
• food: 2-5 € / day
• pocket money: depends on which type of traveler the students is
• spare time costs: depends on which type of traveler the students is
Name of University and number of students accepted:
Tehran University of Medical Scences, Tehran, 4 students in the same time
Period and duration of program:
15 sep – 1 jan
15 feb – 15 march
1 march – 15 jun
Deadline of application: 3-4 months in advance
Clinical work possibility: All departments
Requirements: English knowledge, CV
Name of NEO: Parham Pedram
Contact: Parham.pss@gmail.com
Cost: Dormitory is about 15$ per day
Name of University and number of students accepted:
university of Foggia, 5 students
Period and duration of program: July August 2015
Deadline: 2 months in advance
Clinical work possibility: clinical workshop endo/surgery/patholog
Name of NEO: Victor Palumbo
Contact: victorspalumbo@gmail.com
Estimated Cost: 500€
Name of University and number of students accepted:
University: Nicosia(Near East University, Faculty of Dentistry) .
Number of acceptance : 12 students
Period and duration of program:
During Summer Holidays (Especially in July and August)
Deadline of application: 1 months in advance
Clinical acitivities : All departments
Requirements: Personal and contact information for emergency, English or Turkish( if it is possible) language requirements
Name of NEO: Cengiz Hakan ERTURFUT
Contact: neo.ncads@gmail.com
Estimated Cost:
Accomodation: €15 per night per person for double bed-room (student dorm, includes breakfast also)
Public Transport: if you want to travel to other cities you must pay €5 for bus, you can use school bus or you must rent a car for €30 per day(renting is generally for two days)
Pocket Money: €15-20 per day. Typical coat of lunch or dinner is €10-20
NEO: Danella Anwer, Neofficer.pads@gmail.com
Name of University and number of students accepted:
University/School:Al-Azhar University
Number accepted per year: Variable
Period and duration of program: July to September, 1 Month program
Deadline of application: 1 month in advance
Clinical work possibility: Depends on students expertise
Social program: Will be scheduled by the NEO
Language requirements: English or arabic
Name of NEO: Danella Anwer
Contact: Neofficer.pads@gmail.com
Estimated Cost:
• accommodation: Can be well arranged depending on the number of students received
• public transport: $1.5 per day
• food: $15-20 per day
• pocket money: depends on the person
• spare time costs: $10-15 per day
Insurance policy requirements: Contact NEO
Sponsorship possibilities: No
Remarks: Clinical Dress Code: scrubs and shoes- all white and clean- name tag, long hair in an up-do, clean, and shaved.
Name of University and number of students accepted:
Available cities/universities: Bratislava(Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovak Medical University) , Kosice (University of Pavol Jozef Safarik )
Number accepted per year: unlimited
Best period for exchange: January, February, July , September
Exam period: December, January, May, June
Exchange duration: variable
Deadline for applications: 2 months before the internship Form of application required: motivation letter, CV Deadline for confirmation: 1 month before the internship
Clinical work possibilities: observing, assistance
Deadline for applications: 2 months before the internship Form of application required: motivation letter, CV
Name of NEO: Natalia Savkova
Contact: neo@ssszl.sk, nataliasavkova3@gmail.com
Estimated Cost: accommodation: 7 euros/day, public transport: around 1 euro for an hour ticket, food: 7-10 euros/day
Pocket money: individual
Spare time costs: cinema: 5 euros, disco entrance: 2-3 euros
Remarks: Clinical dress code: Trousers, T-shirt and Shoes – all white and clean.
Available cities/universities: Ljubljana
Best period for exchange: October – June
Exchange duration: 1 week
Language requirements: Slovenian / English
Deadline for applications: at least 1 month in advance
Form of application required: original paper with school or NEO stamp sent via email
Deadline for confirmation: at least three weeks
Type of exchange: unilateral
Number incomings accepted per year: no limits
Clinical work possibilities: observing, assistance
Name of University and number of students accepted:
Faculty of Dentistry in Monastir
Maximal number of acceptance 10 students per year (it is variable and it will be updated if changed)
Period and duration of program:
Period : July and August
Duration : 2 to 4 weeks
Deadline of application:
2 months in advance
1st of May 2015 for the period of July
1st of June 2015 for the period of August
Clinical work possibility
Activities : Clinical observation and assistance. This is up to the person in charge during the period when the student will have his internship. (updates in the matter will be shared soon)
Language requirements : English, Frensh
-IADS application form with photo.
-scan of passport.
-motivation letter from your university’s dean (with student name).
-confirmation letter after acceptance (one month in advance).
-application form must be sent by the NEO/LEO in charge to confirm the participant membership to the association. and contact must be held between NEOs/LEOs in charge until the end of the participant internship.
Name of NEO: Ahmed Chiheb Derouiche
Contact: tads1415neo@gmail.com
Estimated Cost: Accomodation : depends on the place where the student will be spending the night. If rented house about 10 euros per night (maybe less)
If hotel about 20 to 25 euros per night
-Food : breakfast costs around 3 euros
lunch/dinner costs around 5 euros
-Social program depends on the student choice: beachs, night clubs… maximum of 15 euros per day.
The overall cost for 2 weeks is around 250 euros.
Availible cities/universities:
Istanbul: Istanbul University, Marmara University, Yeditepe University, Bezm-I Alem University
Ankara: Gazi University
Zonguldak: Bülent Ecevit University
Best period for exchange: October to December, March to May, July, August
Exchange duration: 2 weeks
Language requirements: English or Turkish
Deadline for applications: 2 months in advance
Form of application required: IADS Application Form with photo and NEO Stamp
Deadline for confirmation: 1 month in advance
Type of exchange: bilateral/unilateral
Number incomings accepted per year: 10
Clinical work possibilities :Observing and assisting in clinics
Accommodation: students’ should book themselves, however staying at another student’s house can be arrangeable
Name of University and number of students accepted:
University of Sharjah – College of Dental Medicine, Sharjah, 4 stud
Period and duration of program:
1st February 2015 – 8th March 2015
5th April 2015 – 30th April 2015*
7th June 2015 – 8th July 2015 (Summer, only clinical)
Duration: 1-2 weeks
Deadline of application: 2 months in advance. For summer exchanges, deadline for applications is 1st of May.
Clinical work possibility: Assisting and observing only
Requirements: Exchange students must have grades that are not less than average, both theoretical and practical, and must be able to communicate in English.
Name of NEO: Shamim (Arshiya) Faraghat
Contact: neo.usdsa@gmail.com
Estimated Cost:
Accommodation: Free if staying in dorms(subject to availability), hotel can be arranged at the students ‘expense at around 70 Euros a night. Food: Breakfast costs around 6 Euros. Lunch/Dinner costs around 10 Euros. Social Program: A social activity can range for 4-22 Euros
In February 1951, the French Dental Students invited some students from other countries to attend their Annual Meeting in Paris where the Danish, Dutch and Swedish representatives proposed to establish an International dental student’s organization.

This proposal was unanimously welcomed, and, in September of that same year, representatives from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom met in Copenhagen. A committee consisting of representatives from Denmark, Holland and the United Kingdom was formed to work out the basic principles on which to build the constitution of the Association. This constitution was drafted and the first Executive Committee was elected; Leslie Sorling from Sweden having the honour of being elected the first President, with Mogens Skougaard from Denmark, Secretary and Carlo Nevejan from Holland, Treasurer. This draft constitution and other Organizational matters were worked out with the advice and encouragement of Professor P.O. Pedersen whose great knowledge of the affairs of the Federation Dentaire International was invaluable and whose interest in dental students is well known. It was indeed appropriate that he was later appointed the first

Honorary Life Member of the IADS

In July 1952, the IADS Council (now the General Assembly) met in Birmingham. The constitution, regulations and plans for the future were put forward by the Executive Committee and it was decided that, in the future, the Annual Session of the Council should coincide with an international dental student congress. It was therefore in 1953 that the first IADS Congress was held at the University of Marburg/Lahn in Germany; some 120 students attended and the official constitution was approved and signed at the Council meeting. The preliminaries had therefore been completed and the Association was launched.

In September 1954 the Dutch dental students organized the second IADS Congress at Groningen and Utrecht; at this meeting the Council began the important work of formulating future policy and deciding upon the various activities which the Association would pursue. Co-operation with other international organizations, especially the World Health Organization and the Federation Dentaire International, were considered and, as a result of this, the close relationship between the F.D.I. and the IADS, to which I shall later refer, was established.

During the next twelve years the young association grew slowly and surely. The 1955 Congress and annual session was held in Malmo and this was followed by those in Newcastle, Oslo, Ghent, Berlin, Stockholm, London, Dusseldorf, Amsterdam and London again in 1965. Only in 1963, due to late cancellation, was there no Congress.

During this time the membership increased to fifteen countries and the Association had become well established in the dental world. The Annual Congress had become a most enjoyable, although mainly social, gathering; it provided almost the only communication between members as the finances of the Association precluded circularized publications. However, the exchange program had become established and this international exchange of dental students has continued to be a most worthwhile and successful project and one of which the IADS can be justly proud.

It was in 1966 that the IADS Congress was held outside Europe for the first time in its history-in Jerusalem. Incidentally, this meeting was my first introduction to the IADS and was the first of the ten Congresses which it has been my privilege to attend. Not only did our Israeli hosts put on a magnificent Congress for the 200 participants, showing us many of the historical and biblical sites of their country from Nazareth to the Dead Sea and from the Mediterranean to the desert, but this Congress also marked the transition of the IADS from that of a young association to that of a mature one attempting to solve its present problems and to plan for a successful future. The General Assembly considered several urgent matters. Firstly, it was appreciated that the enrollment of new members had so far been confined almost entirely to Western Europe; a recruitment drive in the Middle East, Eastern Europe and North America was therefore initiated. Secondly, it was stressed that some regular contact between member countries must be provided throughout the year if the association was to retain the interest and co-operation of its members, and a newsletter with some commercial sponsorship was planned. Thirdly, the increasing volume and complexity of business to be considered by the General Assembly made it essential that this be conducted in a well-ordered ‘and democratic manner, presided over by an independent Chairman. . .

At the 1967 Congress in Paris there was already evidence that the recruitment drive was meeting with some success and that the newsletter, although at this time rather thin and infrequent, was being appreciated by the members. It was also in 1967 that Dr. Gerald Leatherman, the Executive Director of the F.D.1, in view of the increasing importance of the IADS, decided that a permanent liaison officer should be appointed whose job it would be to keep the F.D.I. informed of IADS matters and to assist the IADS when requested by its Executive Committee, thus contributing some degree of continuity. It was my good fortune to be appointed to this office on completion of my year as IADS Treasurer.

In 1968 the IADS visited Eastern Europe for its Congress in Czechoslovakia at which observers from Egypt, Hungary, Japan and Turkey were present; by this time, also, the newsletter was becoming better produced, due almost entirely to the energy of its editor, Brian McMullen. Even with considerable sponsorship, it was costing the Association a large proportion of its annual, income; however, the continuing improvement in communication between members was certainly worth this high expenditure.

By 1969, North America was showing interest in the Association and, at the Congress arranged jointly between Copenhagen and Malmo, both the United States of America and Canada attended as observers for the first time. The New York Dental School applied for corresponding membership and thus the door to North America was at last opening. By this time, also, another international dental student association was being established, albeit a regional one. The Asian Pacific Dental Students Association was formed in

Southeastern Asia and liaison with this Association was established. The A.P.D.S.A. is now a flourishing regional organization, obviously fulfilling a local need, and there has, to the best of my knowledge, never been any intention to expand the A.P.D.S.A. outside its present area. It is my hope that, as intercontinental travel becomes ever easier, a future combined meeting might be arranged, for I am sure that an insight into each other’s very different approaches to dentistry would be of great mutual interest and benefit.

Berlin was host to the IADS for the second time in 1970 and it was at this Congress that a major reappraisal of the Scientific Program for future Congresses took place. It was Mr. Mark-John Vella-Bardon who urged that discussion groups should replace formal lectures as the major content of the Scientific Program; whilst dental students have a great variety of lectures available in their own countries, the IADS Congress provides a unique opportunity for international discussion on dental topics of mutual interest. The success of these groups was immediately apparent when they were subsequently introduced. The conclusions of these discussion groups were forwarded to, amongst others, the relevant F.D.I. Commission. As a result, in 1973, the F.D.I. Commissions on Dental Education, Dental Practice and Public Dental Health each invited the IADS to appoint a representative to participate in their Commission meetings at the F.D.I. Congresses. It is obviously of benefit to the F.D.I. to have informed student opinion available-the very considerable contributions to the 1976 F.D.I. meetings in Athens made by your representative, Asterios Doukoudakis, were greatly appreciated. I hope that the IADS will continue to avail itself of this invitation to participate on the FDI Commissions. It provides the IADS representatives with the opportunity to meet and talk with many of the world’s most important and influential dental clinicians, educators and administrators and to spread information about the IADS

In 1971, the Association paid its first visit to its smallest member, Malta, and under the Chairmanship of Mark-John Vella-Bardon, a magnificent Congress was arranged. It was at this meeting that the two very active North American Coordinators, Jeffrey Leeds and Barry Grayson, presented the application for membership of the newly-formed American Student Dental Association, as well as more Canadian Schools, Mexico and Nicaragua. In addition, Egypt, Greece and Italy were elected members at this meeting. It is to be hoped that it will not be too long before the American Student Dental Association rejoins the IADS once again as a full member.

1972 saw a hastily arranged Congress in England and the joining of Australia as a corresponding member. Very much more important, it was the year in which Quintessence International took over the publication and distribution of the newsletter. This most generous offer by the Berlin publishing house has provided the IADS with the opportunity to provide its members with a quarterly newsletter of the highest quality and which is printed and circulated worldwide at no expense to the Association. So far, your editors have produced a newsletter worthy of such publication and it is of paramount importance that this be maintained.

The overnight improvement to the IADS finances brought about by this publishing arrangement is most welcome as for so many years the Association’s financial situation restricted its activities. There is now the real opportunity for the IADS to secure its financial position and to build for the future.

1973 and 1974, with the two highly successful Congresses in Finland and Holland, saw one of the most difficult and serious problems facing IADS at least partly solved. Any student organization which is administered and governed by students faces considerable problems of continuity from one year to the next, as almost all of the office holders serve for either one or two years before graduation and hand over to a successor who is frequently resident in a different country. This has been, I believe, the greatest hindrance to the growth of the Association ever since its foundation in 1951. However, I have always believed that this is preferable to a student organization where the students do not retain sole executive powers. Indeed, the FDI, whilst always available to assist your Association, have always been insistent that such assistance must first be requested or approved by the IADS, as we have no wish to interfere in the affairs of your association.

At the General Assembly in 1974, delegates learned of the offer of the Medical Protection Society, a professional insurance organization in London, to provide a central address and some secretarial assistance to the IADS Since the acceptance of this offer, a restructuring of the administration has been gradually very evident that the continuity offered by this arrangement is of great value to the Association. The IADS, I believe, owes a very considerable debt of gratitude to Mr. John Seear for initiating this service.

The magnificent Congresses held in Israel in 1975 and in Switzerland in 1976 bring this short historical review up-to-date, except to report that already this year the first meeting of the newly-formed Australian Dental Students Association, comprising the dental schools of Australia and New Zealand has been held in Dunedin and to commend the Maltese Dental Students for their invitation to hold the 1977 Congress in Malta at such short notice.

Whilst I hope that this look back at the past problems and achievements of the IADS has been of interest, it is the present and future of your Association which is of greater importance and which will concern your General Assembly in Malta. Your Executive Committee and official delegates will be deciding the priorities for the coming year and I would not wish to comment on these.

As the FDI Liaison Officer, I have watched the development of the IADS over the past decade. The success of the newsletter, the improvements in administration and finances and the increasing membership augur well for the future. I take this opportunity to congratulate the IADS on what has been achieved so far and to wish your Association a very happy and successful future

In an address at the Opening Ceremony of the IADS Congress in Malta in July 1977, Peter Swiss, the liaison officer, gave a comprehensive account of the history of the IADS, from its origin in Paris in 1951.

The Association has had its thirtieth birthday and is now an established forum for dental students all over the world and I plan in the next few paragraphs to give an account of how it has developed over the last ten years.

My first encounter with the IADS occured during the mid-year meeting of 1977, These were not always held in London and that year Glasgow were the hosts and it coincided with my first attendance at a British Dental Students’ Association conference. It was, however, a year later, at the midyear meeting in London when as secretary of the BDSA I was able to meet with members of the executive.

Later in 1978, I was fortunate to attend the Cleveland, Ohio Congress as one of the UK delegates. As well as being my first congress, this was also the first one for Mr. Lynn Waiters. I am not sure if either of us imagined that this would be the start of such a long association with the IADS. Lynn Waiters attended that Congress, as he has continued to do, on behalf of the Medical Protection Society, which since 1974 has acted as the central office for the 1ADS. Mr. John Seear was responsible for setting up this service and the Association owes a great deal to the MPS for the way in which they have maintained continuity over the last thirteen years. John Seear attended his last Congress in Alexandria, Egypt in 1981, just prior to his retirement, and those of us who were there will remember the skiliful way in which he guided the General Assembly through one of its more difficult agendas.

It would be very easy to write an account of the last ten years; without mentioning some of the problems which have occurred. I don’t intend to do this, because I believe that the Association has become stronger through facing up to its problems and that it will continue to progress providing it recognizes and then deals with the difficulties as they arise. The Congress of 1979 was set in the beautiful city of Freiburg, West Germany. It was however a conference beset by management problems due partly to failure of the CoCo, to appreciate the importance of sponsorship in a congress of such size. Successive CoCos have realized the necessity of gaining help from commercial sources a daunting and difficult task, but one which has been tackled, is some cases, by hard-nosed business acumen.

One of the main areas of difficulty, about which I felt strongly, was that of a constitution which seemed to slow down proceedings and often caused the General Assembly to come to a virtual standstill over a procedural point. Valuable debating time was often lost. In 1980, at the Utrecht Congress, a small working party, under the Chairmanship of the IADS President, Wojieck Kowalski, set about reviewing the entire constitution. This proved to be a long and arduous task, and indeed two further attempts were necessary Egypt 198I and Puerto Rico 1983 -before the constitution we use today was finally accepted.

The period between the congress in Utrecht and the one is Helsinki 1982, was, for the Association, an unsettled time, the effects of which may still be felt today. The Association is a non-political organization from which nobody can be excluded through reasons of race or creed. I believe this is right and in many ways unique. The International Association of Medical Students for example is fraught with problems of a political nature. However, for a time, the Association was made to face political reality not unnaturally in view of its international composition, but in a way which left some member nations feeling that they had no alternative but to leave. I regret their decision but understand that not every student body is independent of government and its policies. I hope that in the future these countries will feel able to rejoin the IADS and realize that their views will be respected. I also hope that the Association will always keep its non-political stance.

In 1967 at the Paris Congress, Peter Swiss who was then IADS Treasurer was appointed FD1/LADS liaison officer by Dr. G.F. Leatherman, the Executive Director of the FDI. He continued in this post until 1983, during which time he regularly attended Congresses, acting as Chairman of the General Assemblies, and was always ready to assist the Association in any way possible. It was with regret that he retired from office, on appointment as Dental Secretary to the Medical Defence Union in London. He always maintains a great interest in the activities of the Association. I was fortunate to be appointed his successor and chaired my first General Assembly in Israel 1984.

In 1984 Lynn Walters was granted Honorary Life Membership by the General Assembly in recognition of the work he had done for the IADS. This honor had previously last been granted to Asterious Doukadakis (President 1977- 78).

Following a successful Congress in New York in 1985, the IADS met in Singapore in 1986. This was the first time that an IADS Congress coincided with a meeting of the Asian Pacific Dental Students’ Association, and it is worth recalling what Peter Swiss wrote in his history of the IADS:

’It is my hope that, as intercontinental travel becomes easier, a future combined meeting might be arranged, for I am sure that an insight into each other’s very different approaches to dentistry might be of great mutual interest and benefit”.

It was indeed a tribute to the organizational skills of the Singaporean hosts that such a meeting was managed and, as Peter Swiss hoped, it did provide a unique opportunity for exchange of ideas.

I hope and believe that the Association can look forward to another thirty years. There are immediate problems to face a declining membership, an uncertain future of Central Office, the loss of the Quintessence International account and more long term decisions to make should there be a voluntary work abroad scheme ? How can the exchange program be improved? In Cleveland I remember vividly one General Assembly which convinced me of the importance and value of the IADS. Delegates from two countries, not enjoying good diplomatic relations, crossed the floor, shook hands and embraced. Wouldn’t it be a better world if all our leaders could meet in the same atmosphere of cooperation and friendship -there would be a much greater understanding of each others problems and solutions might be more easily found….

February 1951, the French Dental Students invited some students from other countries to attend their Annual Meeting in Paris where the Danish, Dutch and Swedish representatives proposed to establish an International dental student‟s organization.

This proposal was unanimously welcomed, and, in September of that same year, representatives from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom met in Copenhagen.

A committee consisting of representatives from Denmark, Holland and the United Kingdom was formed to work out the basic principles on which to build the constitution of the Association, this constitution was drafted and the first Executive Committee was elected; Leslie Sorling from Sweden having the honor of being elected the first President, with Mogens Skougaard from Denmark, Secretary and Carlo Nevejan from Holland, Treasurer.

This draft constitution and other organizational matters were worked out with the advice and encouragement of Professor P.O. Pedersen whose great knowledge of the affairs of the Federation Dentaire International (FDI) was invaluable and whose interest in dental students is well known. It was indeed appropriate that he was later appointed as an Honorary Life Member of the IADS

In July 1952, the IADS Council (now the General Assembly) met in Birmingham. The constitution, regulations and plans for the future were put forward by the Executive Committee and it was decided that, in the future, the Annual Session of the Council should coincide with an international dental student event.

Therefore in 1953 that the first IADS Congress was held at the University of Marburg/Lahn in Germany; some 120 students attended and the official constitution was approved and signed at the Council meeting. The preliminaries had therefore been completed and the Association was launched.

September 1954 the Dutch dental students organized the second IADS Congress at Groningen and Utrecht; at this meeting the Council began the important work of formulating future policy and deciding upon the various activities which the Association would pursue. Co-operation with other international organizations, especially the World Health Organization and the Federation Dentaire International, were considered and, as a result of this, the close relationship between the F.D.I. and the IADS was established.

1954 to 1966 memberships increased to fifteen countries and the Association had become well established in the dental world. The Annual Congress had become a most enjoyable, although mainly social, gathering; it provided almost the only communication between members as the finances of the Association precluded circularized publications. However, the exchange program had become established and this international exchange of dental students has continued to be a most worthwhile and successful project and one of which the IADS can be justly proud 1966 that the IADS Congress was held outside Europe for the first time in its history-in Jerusalem. THIS marked the transition of the IADS from that of a young association to that of a mature one attempting to solve its present problems and to plan for a successful future. The General Assembly considered several urgent matters. Firstly, it was appreciated that the enrollment of new members had so far been confined almost entirely to Western Europe; a recruitment drive in the Middle East, Eastern Europe and North America was therefore initiated.

Secondly, it was stressed that some regular contact between member countries must be provided throughout the year if the association was to retain the interest and co-operation of its members, and a newsletter with some commercial sponsorship was planned.

Thirdly, the increasing volume and complexity of business to be considered by the General Assembly made it essential that this be conducted in a well-ordered „and democratic manner, presided over by an independent Chairman. .

At the 1967 Congress in Paris there was already evidence that the recruitment drive was meeting with some success and that the newsletter, although at this time rather thin and infrequent, was being appreciated by the members. It was also in 1967 that Dr. Gerald Leatherman, the Executive Director of the F.D.I, in view of the increasing importance of the IADS, decided that a permanent liaison officer should be appointed whose job it would be to keep the F.D.I. informed of IADS matters and to assist the IADS when requested by its Executive Committee, thus contributing some degree of continuity.

1968 the IADS visited Eastern Europe for its Congress in Czechoslovakia at which observers from Egypt, Hungary, Japan and Turkey were present; by this time, also, the newsletter was becoming better produced, due almost entirely to the energy of its editor, Brian McMullen. Even with considerable sponsorship, it was costing the Association a large proportion of its annual, income; however, the continuing improvement in communication between members was certainly worth this high expenditure.

1969 the United States of America and Canada attended as observers. For the first time The New York Dental School applied for corresponding membership and thus the door to North America was at last opening. By this time, also, another international dental student association was being established, albeit a regional one. The Asian Pacific Dental Students Association was formed in Southeastern Asia and liaison with this Association was established

1970 a major reappraisal of the Scientific Program for future Congresses took place. It was Mr. Mark-John Vella-Bardon who urged that discussion groups should replace formal lectures as the major content of the Scientific Program; whilst dental students have a great variety of lectures available in their own countries, the IADS Congress provides a unique opportunity for international discussion on dental topics of mutual interest. The success of these groups was immediately apparent when they were subsequently introduced. The conclusions of these discussion groups were forwarded to, amongst others, the relevant F.D.I. Commission.

1971, the Association paid its first visit to its smallest member, Malta, and under the Chairmanship of Mark-John Vella-Bardon, a magnificent Congress was arranged. It was at this meeting that the two very active North American coordinators, Jeffrey Leeds and Barry Grayson, presented the application for membership of the newly-formed American Student Dental Association, as well as more Canadian Schools, Mexico and Nicaragua. In addition, Egypt, Greece and Italy were elected members at this meeting.

1972 Australia joined as a corresponding member. Very much more important, it was the year in which Quintessence International took over the publication and distribution of the newsletter. This most generous offer by the Berlin publishing house has provided the IADS with the opportunity to provide its members with a quarterly newsletter of the highest quality and which is printed and circulated worldwide at no expense to the Association.

in 1973, the F.D.I. Commissions on Dental Education, Dental Practice and Public Dental Health each invited the IADS to appoint a representative to participate in their Commission meetings at the F.D.I. Congresses. It is obviously of benefit to the F.D.I. to have informed student opinion available-the very considerable contributions to the 1976.

1974, delegates learned of the offer of the Medical Protection Society, a professional insurance organization in London, to provide a central address and some secretarial assistance to the IADS Since the acceptance of this offer, a restructuring of the administration has been gradually very evident that the continuity offered by this arrangement is of great value to the Association.

1980 to 1982 the constitution seemed to slow down proceedings and often caused the General Assembly to come to a virtual standstill over a procedural point. Valuable debating time was often lost. In 1980, at the Utrecht Congress, a small working party, under the Chairmanship of the IADS President, Wojieck Kowalski, set about reviewing the entire constitution. This proved to be a long and arduous task, and indeed two further attempts were necessary Egypt 198I and Puerto Rico.

1983 when the constitution we use today was finally accepted.

1986 Singapore, this was the first time that an IADS Congress coincided with a meeting of the Asian Pacific Dental Students‟ Association.

1987 was “declining membership, an uncertain future of Central Office, the loss of the Quintessence International account and more long term decisions to make should there be a voluntary work abroad scheme? How can the exchange program be improved?

1996: Formation of the AIDS committee, gather information about AIDS and send it through the Dental Students. Organizing a summer school, producing a booklet that is to be published and distributed by IADS.

1998 SPECIAL SESSION OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY BARCELONA, SPAIN:

This was the year when the annual meeting that was planned to take place in August 1998 in Belgrade was cancelled due after a long process of consultation with the organizers, the Executive Committee, the FDI, various foreign ministries, the member associations and the Honorary Life members.

The Congress had been cancelled because of:

  • A low number of registrations (25), which included 3 NEOs. This would have made it impossible to hold a valid General Assembly. The deadline for registrations had been extended, twice, at the request of the CoCo to allow more time for people to register. However, this had not been successful.
  • A lack of sponsorship, which together with the lack of registrations, made the Congress financially enviable.
  • Political problems in Yugoslavia, which made people not want to attend. This contributed to the low numbers of registrations.

And thus a special session was held in Barcelona in October to compensate for the meeting. The acceptance if the school in Bergen (Norway) as Full School Members, the two Norwegian schools had formed an International Committee, which would represent both of them as Full Country Members for Norway.

1999: IADS Committee was thanked for their work and after they collected enough information, Organized a summer school, made the booklet and present a seminar, their job was done and the committee was closed.

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